QCCSRC Videos

QCCSRC Video Rock-Fluid

Carbon Capture and Storage is a vital technology for deployment in our efforts to keep global warming near to the much discussed 2 ˚C threshold.
Imperial College has a history of expertise in CCS – because of this Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science and Technology Park began funding the Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre at Imperial College – a ten year project, finishing at the end of 2018, with $70 million (USD) in funding.
To make CCS globally commercial viable requires a detailed understanding of the character of the rocks in question; an understanding of the interaction between rocks and fluids at various levels; and the behaviour of fluids in a wide range of conditions. The Centre brings together over 80 researchers and PhD students from nearly 30 different countries to provide expertise in all these areas. There are researchers working on how fluids (e.g., carbon dioxide) flow through rocks of varying porosity and heterogeneity and we have built a dedicated imaging laboratory using X-Ray computer-aided tomography (CT) to observe the properties of carbon dioxide at reservoir conditions in an area of technology now known as “digital rocks”. There are a team of modellers and simulation experts that help make full use of the experimental data to help validate their predictive tools.

QCCSRC Video Rock-Fluid

QCCSRC Video Rock-Fluid

How fluids (e.g., carbon dioxide) flow through rocks of varying porosity and heterogeneity

Carbon Capture and Storage is a vital technology for deployment in our efforts to keep global warming near to the much discussed 2 ˚C threshold.
Imperial College has a history of expertise in CCS – because of this Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science and Technology Park began funding the Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre at Imperial College – a ten year project, finishing at the end of 2018, with $70 million (USD) in funding.
To make CCS globally commercial viable requires a detailed understanding of the character of the rocks in question; an understanding of the interaction between rocks and fluids at various levels; and the behaviour of fluids in a wide range of conditions. The Centre brings together over 80 researchers and PhD students from nearly 30 different countries to provide expertise in all these areas. There are researchers working on how fluids (e.g., carbon dioxide) flow through rocks of varying porosity and heterogeneity and we have built a dedicated imaging laboratory using X-Ray computer-aided tomography (CT) to observe the properties of carbon dioxide at reservoir conditions in an area of technology now known as “digital rocks”. There are a team of modellers and simulation experts that help make full use of the experimental data to help validate their predictive tools.

QCCSRC Video Fluid-Fluid

QCCSRC Video Fluid-Fluid

working on thermophysical and transport properties of fluids

Carbon Capture and Storage is a vital technology for deployment in our efforts to keep global warming near to the much discussed 2 ˚C threshold. Imperial College has a history of expertise in CCS – because of this Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science and Technology Park began funding the Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre at Imperial College – a ten year project, finishing at the end of 2018, with $70 million (USD) in funding.

To make CCS globally commercial viable requires a detailed understanding of the character of the rocks in question; an understanding of the interaction between rocks and fluids at various levels; and the behaviour of fluids in a wide range of conditions.
The Centre brings together over 80 researchers and PhD students from nearly 30 different countries to provide expertise in all these areas. There are researchers working on thermophysical and transport properties of fluids (i.e., phase behaviour, interfacial properties, viscosity, diffusion coefficient, density) and are improving our understanding of how fluids behave in the reservoir.
There are a team of modellers and simulation experts that help make full use of the experimental data to help validate their predictive tools.

QCCSRC – Geosciences Summary

QCCSRC – Geosciences Summary

An understanding of the interaction between rocks and fluids

Carbon Capture and Storage is a vital technology for deployment in our efforts to keep global warming near to the much discussed 2 ˚C threshold.

Imperial College London has a history of expertise in CCS – because of this Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science and Technology Park began funding the Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre at Imperial College – a ten year project, finishing at the end of 2018, with $70 million (USD) in funding.

To make CCS globally commercial viable requires a detailed understanding of the character of the rocks in question; an understanding of the interaction between rocks and fluids at various levels; and the behaviour of fluids in a wide range of conditions.

The Centre brings together over 80 researchers and PhD students from nearly 30 different countries to provide expertise in all these areas. This includes fieldwork in Oman, UAE, Spain and the UK to help better understand the reservoir geology in the Middle East supplemented with laboratory work including the first application of clumped isotopes to reservoir descriptions

QCCSRC Videos

QCCSRC Multiscale Imaging Laboratory
Investigating new ways of storing C02 in rock reservoirs
Introduction to carbon capture and storage and its potential as a means of climate change mitigation.

Internal links

External links

NameLink
Qatar Geological Society  http://www.qgeosoc.com/
Qatar Natural History Group  http://www.qnhg.org/
Shell Qatar Carbonate Research  http://www.shell.com.qa/
Qatar Petroleum Research Centre  http://www.qstp.org.qa/output/Page2071.asp
Qatar Science and Technology Park http://www.qstp.org.qa/output/page7.asp
External Links