Academic  Academic Foundation Programmes give medical school graduates the ability to both attain the training required of them as part of their Foundation Programme, as well as receive a comprehensive introduction to academic medicine. It is an excellent opportunity for those students interested in pursuing research, teaching, leadership and management alongside the competencies outlined in the foundation programme curriculum.  

The North West Thames Foundation School, together with the Faculty of Medicine of Imperial College London, and some of its partner NHS Trusts, has developed a range of exciting Academic Foundation Programmes, which are of the highest standard. We are seeking to recruit highly motivated applicants, who can demonstrate a consistently excellent medical school record. Successful applicants will spend part of their two-year Foundation Programme within academic- and research-based environments, working with renowned clinicians and researchers in recognised centres of excellence. Details of how to apply for academic programmes can be found on the How to apply page.


Job descriptions

Academic Anaesthetics

Type of programme:  This is a four-month research placement in Academic Anaesthetics, at Chelsea & Westminster/Royal Marsden.

Brief outline of department: The Magill Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Management is a combined Academic and NHS department. There is a wide range of projects available in both departments. The Department has a broad mixture of academic and NHS anaesthetic consultants, an ITU and HDU, six main theatres, paediatric and obstetric theatres and a treatment centre. The Department has more than 30 consultants and 32 trainee anaesthetists.

The Academic Department of Anaesthetics was established at the Westminster Hospital in 1966. It is now led by Professor Masao Takata and is part of the Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine, and Intensive Care (APMIC) Section of the Division of Surgery, Imperial College London. See the Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care website.

The NHS Magill Department changed its name to the Magill Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care & Pain Management in 1998 to reflect the broad nature of its activities. Specialist areas where projects can be undertaken include Intensive Care medicine, Pain management (acute and chronic), burns, and paediatric and obstetric anaesthesia. The high fidelity patient simulation facility at Chelsea & Westminster is headed by the anaesthetic department and offers further research and education opportunities. See the Magill Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Management website.

Structure of academic project/what expected: The AF2 year will include four months of A&E and four months of Academic Anaesthetics at Chelsea & Westminster Hospital as well as four months in Intensive Care at the Royal Marsden Hospital. The anaesthetic placement can cover projects in anaesthesia, outreach, post-operative recovery and pain relief research, based on the AF2’s skills and preferences.  The posts are well suited for those wishing to gain a basic grounding in peri-operative medical research and have been highly valued by previous AF2s.  Education is a key objective for the academic department with medical students (including BSc) and postgraduate training. The AF2 would be expected to contribute to education in all areas of anaesthesia and pain management.

Clinical commitments during academic placement: There is no fixed clinical commitment during the Academic placement. However, there is the opportunity to develop clinical skills if desired.

Departmental academic teaching programme (if applicable):  There is weekly departmental teaching as well as weekly Trust F2 teaching.

Academic Lead: Dr Seth Galton, Consultant Anaesthetist (seth.galton@chelwest.nhs.uk) 

Academic/Clinical Genetics

Type of programme: This is a four-month research and clinical placement in Genetics, at Northwick Park Hospital.

Brief outline of department:  The North West Thames Regional Genetics Service (NWTRGS) is a fully integrated, diagnostic genetic service, which provides cytogenetic, molecular and clinical genetics services for a population of 3.6 Million in North West London, Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire.

The clinical geneticists and genetic counsellors provide an outpatient-based diagnostic and counselling service at Northwick Park Hospital and numerous outreach clinics.  Individuals with a genetic disorder, or relatives at risk of a genetic disorder, are seen and advised of the causes and consequences of the disorder, the risk of developing or transmitting it and the options available to them such as tests, treatment or prevention.  Clinics are also held for those where there is a familial history of cancer.

Further information can be found on the London North West Healthcare website.

Structure of academic project/what expected: The AF2 year is based at Northwick Park Hospital and will include four months of A&E, 4 months of Gastroenterology, and 4 months of clinical/academic genetics. Research plays an integral role in clinical genetics. In addition, the impact of genetics is increasingly relevant in all branches of mainstream medicine. It is our aim to provide an opportunity for AF2s to develop key skills required for an academic career at the same time as gaining experience of clinical genetics and an understanding of the role of this specialist service within the NHS.

The AF2s conduct a research project during their time in the department. Projects might be clinical or laboratory based. The aim of the project is publication in a peer-reviewed journal.  Typically, AF2s spend two days per week on the research project and three in the clinical area, but this is variable. Previous AF2s did projects within the department, but others were based at a variety of academic departments within Imperial College. Projects are tailored to the individual’s long-term career aims and are discussed several months before placement starts, to allow for planning.  Examples of previous projects include: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia; Congenital Myopathy; Silver-Russell Syndrome; Familial Phaeochromocytoma; and Familial Adenomatous Polyposis.

By the end of the four-month placement, the AF2 is expected to draw family trees and examine for common genetic conditions (Neurofibromatosis type 1, Marfan Syndrome, among others), supervised by a consultant. All AF2s are expected to write a case report during their time in the department.  There are always interesting cases available. Previous AF2s were very successful and there have been multiple publications. AF2s are also encouraged to carry out an audit project within the department.

Clinical commitments during academic placement: The AF2 mainly works with the clinical genetics team. The work is entirely outpatient based and working hours are 9:00 to 17:00, Monday to Friday. Entry level is ST3, so AF2s are supernumerary.  The AF2 attends clinics (typically two per week, but often a single whole day clinic), and is expected to prepare the clinic in advance and discuss with the consultant. Referrals include general, paediatric and cancer referrals.  Clinics take place at Northwick Park Hospital and various other locations throughout the catchment area of the service.

Departmental academic teaching programme: In-house teaching and academic seminars provide basic knowledge and insight into the range of research opportunities within this specialty. Since there is close liaison between clinical and diagnostic laboratory staff within the department, trainees are able to observe the work of the diagnostic molecular and cytogenetic laboratories. Weekly meetings are held to discuss results with laboratory staff. Trainees are allocated an academic and clinical supervisor responsible for overseeing progress throughout the attachment and providing further career guidance.

 Academic lead: Dr Neeti Ghali, Consultant in Clinical Genetics (neeti.ghali@nhs.net)

Academic Medicine

Type of programme: This a research post where the AF2 will have the opportunity to spend four months doing cutting-edge research within a research group anywhere with the very large Department of Medicine at Imperial College, at Hammersmith Hospital.

Brief outline of department: The AF2 can choose to be attached to any one of a number of world-class research units within the Department of Medicine at Imperial College – explore the Department of Medicine website to understand the breadth and quality of opportunities available. The Department is comprised of five world-class divisions – Brain Sciences, Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Experimental Medicine, Immunology and Inflammation, and Infectious Disease. The Academic F2 can be attached to groups within any of these and undertake basic laboratory research, more clinical research and projects including innovative imaging and computing.  Depending on the AF2’s interests there are also possibilities for attachments in more diverse laboratories - for instance, a recent stint by one Academic F2 in the Department of Bioengineering.  We aim to facilitate the AF2 in finding the project and department that suits them, and will allow them the greatest opportunity to achieve outstanding academic outputs. Many of our previous AF2s have produced first author papers and / or presentations by the end of their programme.

Structure of academic project/what expected: The F2 year will consist of 4 months of Acute Medicine and 4 months of Renal medicine based at Hammersmith Hospital, and 4 months of Academic Medicine at any of the Imperial sites. Professor Liz Lightstone, Professor of Renal Medicine and consultant Nephrologist oversees the Academic Medicine placements but the Academic F2 will be supervised during their academic placement by the relevant academic lead for the research project undertaken.

Professor Lightstone will assist trainees in finding the right supervisor early on in their F1 year to facilitate planning and familiarity with the group and ensure that they get the most out of their 4-month placement by being fully prepared.  Each trainee will identify an academic supervisor within their chosen research group who will meet with them regularly, set the academic learning objectives at the beginning of the placement and review progress at the end of the placement. 

There is access to wide range of teaching and other learning opportunities within the department, and each doctor will be strongly encouraged to make the most of these in order to support their personal learning plan. There will also be the opportunity to develop important transferable skills in the writing of ethics and grant applications, performing statistical analysis, and writing and revising manuscripts. Other learning opportunities, such as the development of educational research skills or understanding quality improvement methodologies will be offered in accordance with the needs of the trainee and the project that they undertake.

It is envisaged that doctors in this Academic Medicine placement will be successful in achieving journal publications and published abstracts, as well as presenting their work in regional and national meetings. The post will be an outstanding introduction to academic medicine, and high performance in the post will undoubtedly strengthen any potential application for CMT / ACF posts.

Clinical commitments during academic placement: There are no fixed clinical commitments and no on-call duties during the Academic Medicine placement.

Departmental academic teaching programme: Academic Foundation doctors will be expected to attend the weekly Department of Medicine Staff round, and any departmental seminars that they wish to attend. There will be different expectations of attendance at seminars within each research group and the academic supervisor will advise the trainees.  They are also expected to attend their home Trust F2 weekly teaching session.

Academic Lead: Prof Liz Lightstone, Consultant Nephrologist (l.lightstone@imperial.ac.uk)

Academic Metabolic Medicine

Type of programme: The AF2 will have the opportunity to spend four months doing cutting edge research in the Department of Investigative Medicine at Hammersmith Hospital.

Brief outline of department: The Department of Investigative Medicine has an outstanding record for translational research and the research profile of the department is world class. The laboratory’s research is both clinical and laboratory based and is conducted by a range of medical doctors and scientists.  

The group has conducted the first human infusions of a number of novel peptides in man which have been done by Clinical Training Fellows (including ghrelin (Wren et al. JCEM 2001), peptide YY (PYY) (Batterham et al. Nature 2002), oxyntomodulin (Cohen et al. JCEM 2003), kisspeptin (Dhillo et al. JCEM 2005, 2007, 2009). The department is well-equipped and consists of a team of clinical academics and basic scientists with a wide variety of scientific expertise who work very closely together.

The Unit is funded by numerous grants including programme grants from the Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Wellcome Trust. The department has a very good record of training junior doctors; in the last five years the Department has trained 12 Wellcome Trust and MRC Clinical Training Fellows and currently there are 5 Wellcome Trust and MRC Clinical Training Fellows in the laboratory. The laboratory has a programme of basic science and translational research investigating appetite pathways in order to develop novel targets for the treatment of obesity. The department also has a strong track record of translational research investigating the action of novel hormones. Further information can be found on the Investigative Medicine departmental website

Structure of academic project/what is expected: The AF2 year will be based at Hammersmith Hospital, and will include 4 months of Acute Medicine, 4 months of Haematology, and 4 months Academic Metabolic Medicine where the AF2 will be given insight into the link between clinical medicine and the laboratory.

The AF2 will be incorporated into the laboratory’s research themes during the four-month research block and is expected to actively participate in a number of defined research projects. This involves working with doctoral and post-doctoral students and a range of other professionals. Additionally, the trainee is expected to partake in the variety of laboratory research meetings and presentations such as the journal club. There is also the opportunity to be involved with teaching and to attend general endocrine clinics.

This is an ideal post in which to gain clinical laboratory experience as well as experience in basic research. The AF2 will work with highly skilled clinical scientists who will provide training in the relevant techniques. The particular value to the AF2 will be in gaining an understanding of metabolic medicine, and being able to interpret dynamic tests in a clinical light.

There will be both academic and clinical supervision throughout the programme.  There will be enthusiastic support for trainees to undertake clinical projects investigating metabolic disease.  This should lead to presentations at National or International meetings. The work of some AF2s in the past has resulted in several peer reviewed publications.

The research will be supervised by Professor Waljit Dhillo (w.dhillo@imperial.ac.uk) and Professor Steve Bloom (s.bloom@imperial.ac.uk). 

Clinical commitments during academic placement:  The AF2 will carry out limited clinical duties, including dynamic pituitary function testing, and will then assess and interpret the results. We have dedicated metabolic medicine ward space both at Charing Cross and Hammersmith Hospitals.

Departmental academic teaching programme (if applicable): The AF2 will attend weekly research meetings as well as Trust F2 teaching.

Academic Lead: Prof Karim Meeran, Professor of Endocrinology (k.meeran@imperial.ac.uk)

Academic Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Academic Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Type of programme: This is a four-month research placement in Obstetrics & Gynaecology based at Queen Charlotte’s Hospital

Brief outline of department: Academic Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Imperial is closely linked to Imperial Academic Health Sciences Centre and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, and the Institute of Reproductive & Developmental Biology (IRDB), one of the largest stand-alone research facilities in O&G in Europe. There is academic expertise in a range of clinical areas linked to Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Gynaecological oncology (Dr Mara Kyrgiou and Dr Sadaf Maghami) Effect of treatment of cancer on reproductive performance (Dr Mara Kyrgiou) Miscarriage and early pregnancy (Prof Tom Bourne, Prof Lesley Regan, Prof Phillip Bennett). Ovarian Function and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (Prof Steven Franks) Cardiovascular adaptation, placentation, fetal growth and pre-eclampsia (Dr Christoph Lees) Prematurity and Parturition (Prof Phillip Bennett, Dr Vasso Terzidou, Dr David Macintyre) In addition there are more basic science-oriented programs including: Stem Cell Biology (Dr Veronique Azura, Dr Wei Cui) G-protein and Tyrosine Kinase Coupled Receptor Biology (Dr Aylin Hanyaloglu, Dr Nick Dibb) Systems Medicine, Microbiome and Metabolome (Dr David MacIntyre, Prof Phillip Bennett) Recent major new initiatives include the role of the microbiome in reproductive health, and integration of large-scale biological data such as transcriptomics, genomics, metabonomics and miromics with clinical at metadata. We became both a Global Alliance Against Stillbirth and Prematurity (GAPPS) Research Centre and a ‘Tommys’ National Miscarriage Research Centre in 2016. Recent O&G research success include criteria for miscarriage diagnosis, (NEJM 2013, BMJ 2015 Bourne), improved surveillance for IUGR (Lancet 2015 Lees), a paradigm shift in understanding miscarriage (Nat Med 2013 Brosens, Regan), miRNA markers to predict preterm birth (2015 Terzidou Bennett), a link between vaginal microbiome, preterm birth and cervical cerclage (Sci Trans Med 2016, MacIntyre Bennett), all leading to international changes to practice.

Structure of academic project/what expected: The AF2 year will contain a 4 month research block in Academic Obstetrics and Gynaecology based at Queen Charlottes Hospital and the Institute of Reproductive & Developmental Biology, Hammersmith Campus, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. Trainees will be under the overall supervision of Professor Phillip Bennett, Director of IRDB. The AF2 will have the opportunity to be part of a highly dynamic and supportive team of doctors and other health professionals working together in academic, service improvement and educational aspects of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. The Academic F2 may select a project from any of the areas of research activity listed above. Depending upon the nature of the project there will be close ‘clinicside ‘or ‘bench-side’ supervision from an appropriate clinical research fellow or scientist together with weekly meetings with the Principal Investigator. If desired, the Academic F2 can be allocated to an Academic Clinical Lecturer, Fellow, or Specialist Registrar mentor during their academic placement. There is access to a wide range of teaching and other learning opportunities within the department. There will also be the opportunity to develop important transferrable skills in the writing of ethics and grant applications, performing statistical analysis, and writing and revising manuscripts. Doctors in this academic placement should be successful in achieving journal publications and published abstracts, and present work in regional and national meetings. The post will be an outstanding introduction and stepping stone into academic Obstetrics and Gynaecology,

Clinical commitment during academic placement: There are no fixed clinical commitments and no on-call duties during the placement.

Departmental academic teaching programme: The department has a comprehensive program of teaching and seminars which the post holder will be encouraged to take part in.

Academic Lead: Prof Phillip Bennett p.bennett@imperial.ac.uk

Academic Paediatrics

Type of programme: This is a research post in Paediatrics, based at St Mary’s and Hammersmith Hospitals.

Brief outline of department:  The Paediatric department at St Mary’s was awarded the inaugural London Deanery ‘Elizabeth Paice Excellence in Education Award’ for Best Clinical Department. One option would be to develop an innovative educational research project within the department. The general paediatric team also has a strong interest in leadership development and quality improvement, and is involved in innovative work to develop models for integrated child health working across primary and secondary care. This includes a public health focus on whole population approaches to care for children and young people. There are also significant developments in adolescent health. There would be possibilities for research and project work in all of these areas.

There is also outstanding academic sub-specialty paediatric research being done by colleagues at St Mary’s in paediatric infectious diseases, paediatric allergy, paediatric haematology, paediatric intensive care, neonatology and other specialities and there are likely to be possibilities to link in with these teams if this was a particular area of interest. In this situation, a primary academic supervisor will be found within the sub-specialty area of interest.

Further information is available on the Imperial College Healthcare Paediatrics website and the Section of Paediatrics website within the Department of Medicine.

Structure of academic project/what expected: The AF2 year will consist of four months Acute Medicine; four months ICU at Hammersmith Hospital; and four months Academic Paediatrics based at St Mary’s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. Trainees will be under the overall supervision of Dr Bob Klaber, who is a Consultant in General Paediatrics and a Medical Educationalist. The AF2 will have the opportunity to be part of a highly dynamic and supportive team of doctors and other health professionals working together in academic, service improvement and educational aspects of paediatrics and child health.

Supervision from Dr Klaber (if undertaking an educational research or integrated child health project), or the primary academic supervisor (if undertaking a project in other areas of paediatrics and child health), will take the form of weekly meetings, with day-to-day support coming from the wider paediatric team. If desired, the Academic F2 can be allocated to a Specialist Registrar level mentor during their academic paediatrics placement.

There is access to a wide range of teaching and other learning opportunities within the department, and each doctor will be strongly encouraged to make the most of these in order to support their personal learning plan. A weekly teaching timetable detailing all opportunities will be sent to each doctor. There will also be the opportunity to develop import transferable skills in the writing of ethics and grant applications, performing statistical analysis, and writing and revising manuscripts. Other learning opportunities, such as the development of educational research skills or understanding quality improvement methodologies, will be offered in accordance with the needs of the trainee and the project undertaken.

It is envisaged that doctors in this Academic Paediatrics placement will be successful in achieving journal publications and published abstracts, as well as presenting their work in regional and national meetings. The post will be an outstanding introduction to academic paediatrics and child health, and high performance in the post will undoubtedly strengthen any potential application for run-through paediatric training at ST1 level.

Clinical commitments during academic placement: There are no fixed clinical commitments and no on-call duties during the Academic Paediatrics placement.

Departmental academic teaching programme: There are many opportunities here and the post-holder will be introduced to these when they start.

Academic Lead: Dr Bob Klaber, Consultant in General Paediatrics (robert.klaber@imperial.nhs.uk)

Academic Primary Care

Type of programme: This is a 4 month research and clinical placement in Academic Primary Care, at St Mary's and Charing Cross.

Brief outline of department: Primary care is a major arm of health service delivery in the UK. This is a role strengthened by the new GP contract and more recent changes that place general practitioners at the forefront of commissioning health services. Academic Primary Care has a vital research role in providing evidence for interventions and a critique on practice, and in equipping undergraduates with skills and knowledge of relevance both to the specialty and to their development as doctors more generally. The academic department at Imperial has strong roots in epidemiological approaches to primary care, and a programme of undergraduate teaching which stretches across the whole curriculum.

The department also organises the Imperial College Master of Public Health (MPH) programme; and hosts the WHO Centre for Public Health Education and Training. These links give opportunities for working on international public health topics. There is also an opportunity to work in other departments and units of the Imperial College School of Public Health, such as the Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics and the Clinical Trials Unit. See the School of Public Health website for further information.

Structure of academic project/what expected: The AF2 year will include four months of A&E at St Mary’s Hospital, four months in either O&G at St Mary’s or Gastroenterology at Charing Cross, and four months in Academic Primary Care. The academic placement is generally located in the Department of Primary Care & Public Health at Charing Cross Hospital or in one of the other departments or units in the Imperial College School of Public Health.

The AF2 will have active roles in teaching and research within the department: two days a week will be reserved for clinical general practice in a teaching Practice attached to the department. They will be allocated an academic and clinical supervisor at the outset of the attachment who will ensure the aims of the attachment are met and to assist your preparation for Foundation Programme assessments.

 The AF2’s week is split between two days in a local general practice, and three days based in the department at Charing Cross Hospital campus. The three days in the department are split between:

  • working on a research project (roughly 60%)
  • teaching medical students (roughly 25%)
  • attending department activities (eg weekly seminars) (roughly 10%)
  • attending training courses (roughly 5%)

The academic lead for the programme is Dr Anju Verma who is supported in this role by other academics in the department. Research projects generally involve either a systematic literature review or an analysis of a data set. Previous F2 doctors have benefited from their experiences and have presented their work at scientific meetings and published their findings in peer-reviewed journals. These publications include articles in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, Journal of Ambulatory Care Management, Journal of Public Health, Informatics in Primary Care, and BMC Clinical Pharmacology.

Please see the Academic Foundation Year Two Doctors website for more details of the programme and experiences of recent Academic F2s in Primary Care.

Clinical commitments during academic placement:  There is a clinical commitment of two days a week in an accredited GP teaching practice. The details of the weekly timetable are negotiated between the academic department and GP surgery, but depend largely on the practice’s clinic times and needs, with Wednesdays generally set aside as a fixed day for academic activities such as departmental meetings and talks.

Departmental academic teaching programme (if applicable): Weekly departmental meetings and seminars as well as weekly Trust F2 teaching.

Academic Lead:  Dr Anju Verma, Faculty Development Lead

Academic General and GI Surgery

Type of programme:  This is an Academic surgical research programme based at St Mary’s Hospital.

Brief outline of department:  The Department is highly multi-disciplinary and includes multiple internationally renowned academic and clinical foci including surgical technology development, discovery biochemistry, cancer biology and medicine, reproductive medicine, critical care and pain management. 

Their goals are to harmonise and develop existing research themes across the Department, and also to capitalise on world leading molecular phenotyping and metabolic profiling research capabilities to create a new healthcare paradigm based on a molecules-to-medicine approach. In particular, the Department will channel exciting new technology developments into clinical practice with particular emphasis on development of personalised healthcare and patient stratification strategies across all our clinical delivery programmes. 

The Department has established four research themes with the objective of integrating new technologies into personalised healthcare at the point-of-care to improve patient outcomes.  These are:

  • Molecular Phenotyping Directed Personalised Healthcare
  • Population, Behaviour and Health Services Research
  • Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology
  • Surgical and Robotic Technologies

 The department also has a major role in the delivery of teaching in surgery and O&G across all levels of the undergraduate curriculum as well as to postgraduates. 

Structure of academic project/what expected: This AF2 year is based at St Mary’s hospital and consists of four months General Surgery; four months A&E; and four months in Academic Surgery which will be based in the Division of Surgery at St Mary’s Hospital.  The post holder will be responsible to the Head of Division of Surgery, Professor George Hanna, and accountable to the Head of Department, Professor Jeremy Nicholson, Professor Ara Darzi and Paul Ziprin, Senior Lecturer.

The purpose of this post is to provide a protected period of time and support in order to achieve competencies in different fields of academia as outlined in the Academic Foundation portfolio. The post is particularly focused on enabling Academic F2 doctors to gain experience in research and build a research profile from which they can apply for ACF posts and apply for research fellowships towards a higher degree.

They will be assisted in developing their teaching and managerial/leadership skills and will contribute to undergraduate teaching. The F2s will have access to clinical and non-clinical academics who can guide them in the development of their academic and research programmes. 

 F2s will be introduced to the research themes of the department and potential projects from the Division of Surgery that would be suitable for the period of research. They will be free to choose the supervisor and project that most appeals to them, provided it is likely to enable the trainee to meet the aims of this programme.

Clinical commitments during academic placement: During the academic surgical placement, the F2 will participate on the day and night on-call rota at SHO level but will be free of routine elective clinical work.

Departmental academic teaching programme:  There is weekly departmental teaching as well as weekly Trust F2 teaching.

Academic Lead:  Dr Paul Ziprin, Consultant Surgeon (p.ziprin@imperial.ac.uk)

Academic Vascular Surgery

Type of programme:  This is a research post in Vascular Surgery at Charing Cross Hospital

Brief outline of department:  The research methods employed within the group include clinical projects, including clinical trials, molecular and cellular biology, material science, ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging, health economics, biostatistics, systematic reviews, metabonomics and fluid dynamics.

 For more information, please visit the Academic Section of Vascular Surgery website.

Structure of academic project/what expected:  The AF2 year will be based at Charing Cross hospital and will consist of four months of Vascular Surgery and four months of A&E at St Mary’s, and four months Academic Vascular Surgery at Charing Cross.  The Academic Surgery placement will be based in the Academic Section of Vascular Surgery at Charing Cross under the supervision of Professor Alun Davies.

During the four months, the AF2 will have the opportunity to be part of a dynamic and productive research team investigating carotid atherosclerosis, chronic venous insufficiency and varicose veins.  The combination of clinical pathology and research techniques will be tailored to accommodate the interests of the AF2 as far as possible, selecting from a number of research projects which are running in parallel.

Supervision from Professor Davies will take the form of weekly meetings, with day-to-day support coming from a team of clinical research fellows, one of whom will be the lead research fellow on the assigned project.

There is access to a number of surgical clinics for the undertaking of clinical research projects and for postgraduate exam preparation as required. There is the opportunity to develop important transferable skills in the writing of ethics and grant applications, performing statistical analysis, and writing and revising manuscripts.

The previous Academic F2s who have completed this placement have been successful in achieving first name author publications, including journal publications, book chapters, letters and published abstracts, as well as presenting their work in national meetings and winning local and national prizes. Furthermore, they have been supported in applying for core training and academic training jobs, and have been successful in securing posts in their chosen specialties.

Clinical commitments during academic placement:  There are no fixed clinical commitments and no on-call duties during the Academic Surgery placement.

Departmental academic teaching programme:  In addition to the Foundation Programme teaching, there are weekly research meetings. Courses will be offered in accordance with the needs of the trainee and the project undertaken. Many of the clinical research fellows teach relevant skills such as statistical analysis, critical appraisal and how to prepare a manuscript at a regional level.

Academic Lead:  Prof Alun H Davies, Professor of Vascular Surgery (a.h.davies@imperial.ac.uk)