Martin Heeney

Dr. Martin Heeney

Martin Heeney is a senior lecturer in materials chemistry in the department of chemistry at Imperial College. His research concentrates upon the design, synthesis and characterisation of organic semiconductor materials for a range of optoelectronic applications, including field effect transistors, photovoltaic devices, light emitting diodes and sensors. Our research is highly multi-disciplinary and collaborative covering aspects of organic, polymer and materials chemistry with a central theme of establishing relationships between molecular design, synthetic methodology, processing and performance.

View Martin's personal webpage

Email: m.heeney@imperial.ac.uk

Abby Casey

Abby Casey

Abby started with the Plastic Electronics Doctoral Training Centre in October 2011 and is now working on Light absorbing donors under the supervision of Dr Martin Heeney and Prof Donal Bradley

This synthesis based project will develop high ionization potential, low bandgap polymers for efficient light harvesting, utilizing a novel class of fused dithienobicyclopentene polymers.  Acceptor co-monomers of varying strength will be co-polymerised to tune optical and electronic properties. Changing the bridging heteroatoms serves as a further tool to fine tune the electronic structure, simultaneously lowering both HOMO and LUMO energy levels.

Email: abby.casey11@imperial.ac.uk

Joshua Green

Joshua Green

Joshua started with the Plastic Electronics Doctoral Training Centre in October 2011 and is now working on non-invasive sensors for the detection of diabetes via breath samples under the supervision of Dr Martin Heeney and Prof. Cees Bastiaansen from Queen Mary University London.

The present methods of diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes are complicated, expensive and invasive, however the identification of acetone as a gaseous biomarker for the disease opens up the possibility of breath analysis to replace or augment these current techniques. It has recently been proven that chiral nematic liquid crystal films can be used to detect the presence of a number of gases, including some volatile organic compounds. With this in mind it is proposed that such chiral nematic liquid crystals could be used to identify the presence of acetone in breath samples if a suitable chiral dopant is used. The goal of this project is to synthesise and test potential dopants in order to bring this possibility closer to reality.

Email: joshua.green11@imperial.ac.uk

Pierre Boufflet

Pierre Boufflet

Pierre joined the Heeney Group for his Masters project in October 2011, and is now in the first year of his PhD funded by the EPSRC Prize Studentship Award. His research focuses on synthesising novel polymers for applications in organic photovoltaic and organic field-effect transistor devices. His current project involves the design, synthesis, and investigation of alternating- and block-copolymers of 3-alkylthiophene and 4-fluoro-3-alkylthiophene derivatives in an effort to probe self-assembly characteristics as well as to synthesise polymers with high dielectric constants, two important factors in the charge-separation stages of producing photocurrent.

Email: pierre.boufflet07@imperial.ac.uk

Jess Shaw

Jess Shaw

Jessica is currently in the first year of her PhD, which is funded by both the EPSRC and Merck as part of an Industrial CASE Studentship. Her PhD focuses on the development of novel, solution processable, p-type, organic semiconducting co-polymers for use in organic field effect transistors.

Email: jessica.shaw07@imperial.ac.uk

Dr. Zhuping Fei

Dr. Zhuping Fei

Zhuping joined the Heeney group as a PDRA in August 2009. His work mainly concentrates on synthesis of organic semiconducting materials for OFET and OPV, as well as characterization of synthesized small molecules and polymers.

Email: z.fei@imperial.ac.uk