In later life, Brian Gliddon would often speak fondly of his time as a student at Imperial in the 1950s, and of the scholarship that had made study at the College possible.

Brian sadly passed away in 2012 – but his generous bequest to the College will ensure that the legacy of his support for scholarships for education in science and engineering will endure for generations to come.

We are profoundly grateful to Brian Gliddon for remembering Imperial in his Will. His generosity will allow more talented young people than ever before to receive a scholarship"

Angela Bowen

Director of Development

The bequest of £750,000 was made to the President’s Scholarship Fund, which provides scholarships for undergraduate and doctoral students. It is the largest single donation ever made to the fund, and will support an additional ten undergraduate scholarships a year. The gift has been invested in the College’s endowment fund where it will yield an annuity that will support student scholarships in perpetuity.

Born and educated in the West Country, Brian won a scholarship to study at Imperial, graduating in 1956 with an MSc in Chemical Engineering. He went on to study for a doctorate under Professor Dudley Newitt, the then head of department, obtaining his PhD in 1959 for his research on hydraulic transport of solids in a vertical pipe.

Brian went on to work in the electricity generation industry, and prior to his retirement held a senior post in the Central Electricity Generating Board. Settling in Southampton, Brian became a keen gardener, his love of flowers inherited from his father, who was head gardener at Endsleigh Cottage, a country house set among the rolling farmland of Devon’s Tamar Valley.

“We are profoundly grateful to Brian Gliddon for remembering Imperial in his Will,” says Angela Bowen, Director of Development at Imperial. “His generosity will allow more talented young people than ever before to receive a scholarship. It is a fitting legacy for a man whose belief in the value of education remained throughout his life. His friends would describe him as a man who didn’t like a lot of fuss – but his quiet generosity deserves to be recognised, and quietly celebrated.”